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Youth Impact Survey Results

Find the results of previous Youth Impact Surveys here. So far, the Children and Youth Planning Table has ran the Youth Impact Survey three times. 

Learn more about the Youth Impact Survey here.


To see how we’re putting into action the data presented below, check out our Data in Action Report.

Click one of the below buttons to jump down to that section. To read a report, click on the image representing it.

2023

 

This data brief is an overview of the 1,867 responses received, with data across UNICEF’s 9 domains (areas) of child and youth well-being. This report provides an excellent overview of how young people are doing post-pandemic in Waterloo Region.

 

This snapshot report separates the data by four geographic regions – Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo, and the Townships – to provide a more accurate picture of how children and youth are doing across Waterloo Region.

 

This snapshot report has data separated by three age groups – ages 9 to 12, 13 to 15, and 16 to 18.

 

This snapshot report compares the experiences of children and youth not born in Canada vs. those born in Canada in order to showcase the well-being trends between these two groups.

 

This snapshot report separates the data by gender identities – boy, girl, gender diverse – to provide a more accurate picture of child and youth well-being.

This snapshot report compares the responses of children and youth from a variety of different sexual orientations in order to provide a more accurate picture of child and youth well-being.

2021

This data brief is an overview of the 1,074 responses received, divided by UNICEF’s 9 domains (areas) of child and youth well-being. As the survey was completed in the summer of 2021, this report provides an excellent overview of how child and youth well-being was impacted by the pandemic.

This snapshot report separates the data by 4 geographic regions–Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo, Townships–to provide a more accurate picture of how children and youth are doing across Waterloo region.

This snapshot report has data separated by three age groups–ages 9 to 12, 13 to 15, and 16 to 18–and reveals that unfortunately, child and youth well-being drops as children grow older.

This snapshot report separates the data by gender identities–boy, girl, another gender identity–to provide a more accurate picture of child and youth well-being.

This snapshot report compares the responses of children and youth who have had experiences of discrimination due to their sexual orientation vs. those who have not in order to showcase how experiences of discrimination due to sexual orientation affects child and youth well-being.

This snapshot report compares the experiences of children and youth who have self-assessed long-term physical or mental health conditions vs. those who do not in order to paint a more reflective picture of the experiences and needs of diverse children and youth.

This snapshot report compares the experiences of children and youth who have expressed experiences of homelessness vs. those who have not in order to showcase how experiences of homelessness affects child and youth well-being

This snapshot report compares the experiences of children and youth not born in Canada vs. those born in Canada in order to showcase the well-being trends between these two groups.

This snapshot report breaks down the responses based on racial identities, showcasing the impact of racial identity to the well-being of children and youth.

2020

This brief is an overview of the 300+ responses received, divided by UNICEF’s 9 domains of child and youth well-being. As the survey was completed in the summer of 2020, this report provides an excellent overview of how children and youth were impacted by the start of the pandemic.